AvatarGILL Walmsley asked 9 months ago
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For the last 3 months I have been suffering from very strange recurrent symptoms that my GP has so far not been much help with and I’m really struggling to understand what could be wrong.
I have had these symptoms about 6 separate times since around mid April. It feels like I have some sort of virus, but (most of the incidences) I have no nose (cold) or throat (cough) symptoms. The symptoms I have are:

1. Extreme tiredness – to the point where all I can do is lie on my sofa all day with the curtains drawn and even making a cup of tea is a huge effort.

2. A strange feeling in my head / face. It feels like I’m dissociated with reality almost – like my head is empty and I feel very foggy.

3. I often have a bad headache and often it is behind my eyes, I also feel heavy pressure in my face.

4. I completely lose my appetite – as an indication, this time around I have lost half a stone in just over a week.

I have had blood tests for thyroid and iron and they are both fine. I take all the immune vitamins and supplements I have ever had recommended, plus manuka honey, plus I douse myself in anti bac hand gel daily.

The only thing I know to add is that I have a deviated septum and am waiting for my operation for that (waiting list is over 6 months) but I’ve been told there is nothing wrong with the sinuses themselves – no polyps etc. I can only breathe through one nostril.

When I get one of these episodes it knocks me out for a week and it’s really becoming debilitating because of the frequency it’s happening – it’s affecting my work and my personal life, and because i have no outward symptoms it’s very difficult to explain what’s wrong.

Is it possible to get recurrent viruses without any cough or cold symptoms or even, sometimes, any pain anywhere? I feel like I am going mad 🙁



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1 Answers
Veronica Petersson - terapeutVeronica Petersson - terapeut Staff answered 9 months ago
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Hello, Gill.
The symptoms that you describe are very similar to sinusitis. However, unfortunately, it is impossible for me to say what caused your problem – was it a viral, bacterial or fungal infection. Among the possible causes of sinusitis these are the most common:

  • anatomical defects of the nasal cavity, trellis labyrinth and / or nasal concha (you described that you have a problem with septum and you will soon have a surgery);
  • acute and chronic infectious processes in the body, especially in the upper respiratory tract;
  • immunodeficiency states;
  • allergy;
  • trauma of the nose and paranasal sinuses;
  • surgical interventions requiring long tamponade of nasal passages.

Forms of the sinusitis
Depending on the localization of the pathological process (lesion of one or another sinus), acute sinusitis is divided into:

  • sinusitis – inflammation of the maxillary sinus;
  • frontal – inflammation of the frontal sinus;
  • sphenoiditis – inflammation of the sphenoid sinus;
  • etmoiditis – inflammation of the trellis labyrinth.

The development of intracranial complications of acute sinusitis can cause death.

The disease can be one- or two-sided, complicated and uncomplicated, one can be affected (monosynusitis), several (polysynusitis) or all (pansinusitis) paranasal sinuses.
Symptoms you describe make me think of these two possible types of sinusitis you might have:
Sphenoiditis
Acute sphenoiditis is usually combined with ethmoiditis. Isolated, this form of the disease is extremely rare. Inflammation manifests itself with pain localized in the eye, neck and occiput.
With the development of sinusitis, the inflammatory process extends to the mucosa of the paranasal sinuses, the submucosa, and in severe cases affects the periosteum and bone walls.
Frontitis
The acutend chronic frontitis proceeds more severely than other forms of acute sinusitis. Against the background of high temperature, nasal breathing becomes more difficult, there are discharge from the nose from the side of the lesion, pain in the forehead area. These signs are more pronounced in the morning. In addition, there is a pain in the eyes and photophobia.
Often in patients with frontitis, the color of the forehead skin changes (hyperemia), the upper eyelid and the supraorbital region on the side of the lesion are swollen. When the inflammatory process spreads to the bone structures, necrosis with fistula formation is possible.
What doctor must do to diagnose sinusitis
It`s NEVER enough with a blood sample, very often inflammation is located only in sinuses and is not shown in blood.
The diagnosis of acute sinusitis is established on the basis of data obtained during the collection of complaints and anamnesis, an objective examination, as well as a number of additional studies. An important role is played by anterior, middle and posterior rhinoscopy, carried out consistently.
In addition, x-rays of the paranasal sinuses are shown in two projections, ultrasound examination, computer or magnetic resonance imaging of the paranasal sinuses.
Treatment of acute sinusitis
Treatment of acute sinusitis, as a rule, is conservative. The main goals are: elimination of the etiologic factor, relief of the pain syndrome, restoration of the outflow of the contents of the affected sinus. In severe and sometimes moderate forms of acute sinusitis, hospitalization of a patient in a hospital is required.
Vasoconstrictive drugs, antihistamines, mucolytics are prescribed. In acute sinusitis of bacterial etiology, antibacterial therapy is indicated, with mild and moderate forms of antibiotics administered orally, in the case of severe disease, parenterally (intramuscularly or intravenously).
In acute sinusitis, intracranial and orbital complications can develop: meningitis, epidural or subdural abscess of the brain, osteomyelitis, purulent inflammation of the soft tissues of the orbit (phlegmon of the orbit).
In severe acute sinusitis, detoxification, hypo-sensitizing, dehydration, immune and symptomatic therapy are indicated. In some cases, it may be necessary to conduct an operative intervention together with active antibiotic therapy.
Please, contact your doctor again and ask for thorough diagnostics.
I wish you best of luck!



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